Overview

Anal cancer is an uncommon type of cancer that occurs in the anal canal. The anal canal is a short tube at the end of your rectum through which stool leaves your body.

Anal cancer can cause signs and symptoms such as rectal bleeding and anal pain.

Most people with anal cancer are treated with a combination of chemotherapy and radiation. Though combining anal cancer treatments increases the chance of a cure, the combined treatments also increase the risk of side effects.

Anal cancer care at Mayo Clinic

Aug. 16, 2016
References
  1. Deng GE, et al. Evidence-based clinical practice guidelines for integrative oncology: Complementary therapies and botanicals. Journal of the Society for Integrative Oncology. 2009;7:85.
  2. Anal carcinoma. Fort Washington, Pa.: National Comprehensive Cancer Network. http://www.nccn.org/professionals/physician_gls/f_guidelines.asp. Accessed May 20, 2016.
  3. Anal cancer treatment (PDQ). National Cancer Institute. http://www.cancer.gov/types/anal/patient/anal-treatment-pdq. Accessed May 20, 2016.
  4. Gardasil (prescribing information). Whitehouse Station, N.J.: Merck & Co. Inc.; 2015. http://www.gardasil.com. Accessed May 20, 2016.
  5. Cervarix (prescribing information). Research Triangle Park, N.C.: GlaxoSmithKline; 2012. https://gsksource.com/cervarix. Accessed May 20, 2016.
  6. Taking time: Support for people with cancer. National Cancer Institute. http://www.cancer.gov/publications/patient-education/taking-time. Accessed May 20, 2016.
  7. Palliative care. Fort Washington, Pa.: National Comprehensive Cancer Network. http://www.nccn.org/professionals/physician_gls/f_guidelines.asp. Accessed May 5, 2016.
  8. Cook AJ. Allscripts EPSi. Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn. March 29, 2016.