Overview

Angelman syndrome is a genetic disorder. It causes developmental disabilities, neurological problems and sometimes, seizures.

People with Angelman syndrome often smile and laugh frequently, and have happy, excitable personalities.

Developmental delays, between about 6 and 12 months of age, are usually the first signs of Angelman syndrome. Seizures often begin between the ages of 2 and 3 years old.

People with Angelman syndrome tend to live a normal life span, but the disease cannot be cured. Treatment focuses on managing medical and developmental issues.

Feb. 07, 2017
References
  1. NINDS Angelman syndrome information page. National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke. http://www.ninds.nih.gov/disorders/angelman/angelman.htm. Accessed Nov. 7, 2016.
  2. National Library of Medicine. Angelman syndrome. Genetics Home Reference. http://ghr.nlm.nih.gov/condition/angelman-syndrome. Accessed Nov. 7, 2016.
  3. Angelman syndrome diagnostic criteria. Angelman Syndrome Foundation. http://www.angelman.org/understanding-as/medical-info/diagnostic-criteria/. Accessed Nov. 7, 2016.
  4. Pagon RA, et al., eds. Angelman syndrome. In: GeneReviews. Seattle, Wash.: University of Seattle, Washington; 1993-2016. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK1116. Accessed Nov. 7, 2016.
  5. Bailus BJ, et al. The prospect of molecular therapy for Angelman syndrome and other monogenic neurologic disorders. BMC Neuroscience. 2014;15:76.
  6. Angelman syndrome diagnostic testing. Angelman Syndrome Foundation. https://www.angelman.org/what-is-as/medical-information/diagnostic-testing/. Accessed Nov. 13, 2016.
  7. Buiting K, et al. Angelman syndrome — Insights into a rare neurogenetic disorder. Nature. 2016;12:584.
  8. Patterson MC (expert opinion). Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn. Nov. 22, 2016.