Preparing for your appointment

In most cases, complications of antiphospholipid syndrome — such as DVT, stroke or pregnancy loss — will prompt you to seek medical care. Depending on your complication, you'll likely see a specialist in vascular disease, obstetrics or hematology.

Here's some information to help you get ready for your appointment.

What you can do

Be aware of any pre-appointment restrictions. At the time you make the appointment, be sure to ask if there's anything you need to do in advance. Make a list of:

  • Your signs or symptoms and when they began.
  • Write down key personal information, including any major recent events or changes in your life.
  • Key medical information, including other conditions or infections you have and family medical history, especially close relatives who've had antiphospholipid syndrome.
  • All medications, vitamins and other supplements you take, including doses.
  • Questions to ask your doctor.

Take a family member or friend along, if possible, to help you remember the information you get.

For antiphospholipid syndrome, some questions to ask your doctor include:

  • What's the most likely cause of my symptoms?
  • What tests do I need?
  • What treatment do you recommend?
  • How will you determine whether my treatment is working?
  • Does this condition increase my risk of any other medical problems?
  • Does this condition increase my risk of health problems during pregnancy? Are there treatments to reduce that risk?
  • Are there brochures or other printed material that I can have? What websites do you recommend?

Don't hesitate to ask other questions, as well.

What to expect from your doctor

Your doctor is likely to ask you a number of questions, including:

  • Do you have a history of stroke or blood clots?
  • Do you have a history of pregnancy complications, such as high blood pressure, miscarriage or stillbirth?
  • Do you have lupus or another autoimmune disorder?
  • Have you ever been tested for sexually transmitted infections or chronic viral diseases, such as hepatitis?
  • Do you have frequent headaches?
  • Have you noticed a red, net-like rash on your wrists or knees?
  • Do you smoke?
Feb. 09, 2017
References
  1. Antiphospholipid antibody syndrome? National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute. http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/health-topics/topics/aps/. Accessed Nov. 28, 2016.
  2. Erkan D, et al. Clinical manifestations of antiphospholipid syndrome. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed Nov. 28, 2016.
  3. Antiphospholipid syndrome. American College of Rheumatology. http://www.rheumatology.org/I-Am-A/Patient-Caregiver/Diseases-Conditions/Antiphospholipid-Syndrome. Accessed Nov. 28, 2016.
  4. Schur PH, et al. Treatment of the antiphospholipid syndrome. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed Nov. 28, 2016.
  5. Lockwood CJ, et al. Pregnancy in women with antiphospholipid syndrome. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed Nov. 28, 2016.
  6. Blood thinner pills: Your guide to using them safely. Rockville, Md.: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. http://www.ahrq.gov/patients-consumers/diagnosis-treatment/treatments/btpills/btpills.html. Accessed Nov. 29, 2016.
  7. Ask Mayo Expert. Warfarin: Dietary recommendations (adult). Rochester, Minn.: Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research; 2016.
  8. Dlott JS, et al. Drug-induced lupus anticoagulants and antiphospholipid antibodies. Current Rheumatology Reports. 2012;14:71.