In most cases, your doctor can diagnose dyshidrosis based on a physical exam. No lab test can specifically confirm a diagnosis of dyshidrosis, but your doctor may suggest tests to rule out other skin problems that have similar symptoms.

For example, a scraping of your skin can be tested for the type of fungus that causes problems such as athlete's foot. Skin allergies and sensitivities can be revealed by exposing patches of your skin to various substances.

April 30, 2016
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  2. Adams DR, et al. Acute palmoplantar eczema (dyshidrotic eczema). http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed Feb. 24, 2016.
  3. Hand and foot dermatitis. Merck Manuals Professional Edition. http://www.merckmanuals.com/professional/dermatologic-disorders/dermatitis/hand-and-foot-dermatitis. Accessed March 4, 2016.
  4. Goldsmith LA, et al., eds. Vesicular palmoplantar eczema. In: Fitzpatrick's Dermatology in General Medicine. 8th ed. New York, N.Y.: The McGraw-Hill Companies; 2012. http://www.accessmedicine.com. Accessed March 4, 2016.
  5. Gibson LE (expert opinion). Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn. March 17, 2016.