Coping and support

Losing the ability to communicate is distressing and incredibly frustrating, both for the person with primary progressive aphasia and for friends and family. To help everyone involved cope:

  • Learn all you can about the condition
  • Have the person with the condition carry an identification card and other materials that can help explain the condition to others
  • Give the person time to talk
  • Speak slowly in simple, adult sentences and listen carefully
  • Take care of your personal needs — get enough rest and make time for social activities

Family members eventually may need to consider long-term care options for the person with primary progressive aphasia. Family members may also need to plan the person's finances and help make legal decisions to prepare for more-serious stages of the condition.

Support groups may be available for you and the person with primary progressive aphasia or related conditions. Ask your social worker or other members of your treatment team about community resources or support groups.

Jan. 05, 2016
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