Treatment

Treatment for schizotypal personality disorder often includes a combination of medication and one or more types of psychotherapy. Many people can be helped by work and social activities that are a fit for their personality style.

Psychotherapy

Psychotherapy, also called talk therapy, may help people with schizotypal personality disorder begin to trust others by building a trusting relationship with a therapist.

Psychotherapy may include:

  • Cognitive-behavioral therapy — identifying and changing distorted thought patterns, learning specific social skills, and modifying problem behaviors
  • Supportive therapy — offering encouragement and fostering adaptive skills
  • Family therapy — involving family members, which may help reduce fighting or emotional distance and improve trust in the home

Medications

There are no medications approved by the Food and Drug Administration specifically for the treatment of schizotypal personality disorder. However, doctors may prescribe an antipsychotic, a mood stabilizer, an antidepressant or an anti-anxiety drug to help relieve certain symptoms, such as psychotic episodes, depression or anxiety. Some medications may help reduce distorted thinking.

April 01, 2016
References
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  2. Hur JW, et al. Biological motion perception, brain responses, and schizotypal personality disorder. JAMA Psychiatry. 2016;73:260.
  3. Stone MH. Paranoid, schizotypal, and schizoid personality disorders. In: Gabbard's Treatment of Psychiatric Disorders. 5th ed. Arlington, Va.: American Psychiatric Association; 2014. http://psychiatryonline.org/doi/full/10.5555/appi.books.9781585625048.gg00pre. Accessed March 14, 2016.
  4. Silk KR. Personality disorders. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed March 14, 2016.
  5. Rosell DR, et al. Schizotypal personality disorder: A current review. Current Psychiatry Report. 2014;16:452.
  6. Get help. National Suicide Prevention Lifeline. http://www.suicidepreventionlifeline.org/gethelp.aspx. Accessed March 16, 2016.
  7. Palmer BA (expert opinion). Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn. March 21, 2016.