Results

Results of cortisone shots typically depend on the reason for the treatment. Cortisone shots commonly cause a temporary flare in pain and inflammation for up to 48 hours after the injection. After that, your pain and inflammation of the affected joint should decrease, and can last up to several months.

July 02, 2016
References
  1. Roberts WN. Intraarticular and soft tissue injections: What agent(s) to inject and how frequently? http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed May 18, 2016.
  2. Roberts WN, et al. Joint aspiration or injection in adults: Complications. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed May 18, 2016.
  3. AskMayoExpert. Corticosteroid injections. Rochester, Minn.: Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research; 2015.
  4. Use of corticosteroids in osteoarthritis. Arthritis Foundation. http://www.arthritis.org/living-with-arthritis/treatments/medication/drug-types/corticosteroids/corticosteroid-injections.php. Accessed May 18, 2016.
  5. Joint injections (joint aspirations). American College of Rheumatology. http://www.rheumatology.org/I-Am-A/Patient-Caregiver/Treatments/Joint-Injection-Aspiration. Accessed May 18, 2016.
  6. Steroid injections. American Society of Surgery of the Hand. http://www.assh.org/handcare/procedures-and-treatment/steroid-injection. Accessed May 18, 2016.
  7. Provenzano DA, et al. Joint injections. In: Practical Management of Pain. 5th ed. Philadelphia, Pa.: Elsevier; 2014. http://www.clinicalkey.com. Accessed May 20, 2016.
  8. Firestein GS, et al. Athrocentesis and injection of joints and soft tissue. In: Kelley's Textbook of Rheumatology. 9th ed. Philadelphia, Pa.: Saunders Elsevier; 2013. http://www.clinicalkey.com. Accessed May 20, 2016.
  9. Barbara Woodward Lips Patient Education Center. Joint injections. Rochester, Minn.: Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research; 2011.