Expertise and rankings

Kidney transplant interdisciplinary teamwork at Mayo Clinic Kidney transplant interdisciplinary team

Kidney transplant interdisciplinary teamwork at Mayo Clinic

Experience

Mayo Clinic kidney transplant surgeons have performed more than 7,000 procedures using state-of-the-art technology since performing their first kidney transplant in 1963.

Each year, Mayo Clinic surgeons perform more than 600 kidney transplants, including numerous complex surgical procedures at campuses in Arizona, Florida and Minnesota.

The Mayo Clinic kidney transplant team has extensive experience in the most complex types of kidney transplantation, including ABO incompatible, positive crossmatch and paired donation kidney transplants.

As a three-site institution, Mayo Clinic has one of the largest living-donor kidney transplant programs in the United States.

Innovation and research

Mayo Clinic transplant researchers take a leading role in efforts to find new, improved ways to conduct all aspects of transplantation, expanding the availability of transplants, reducing risks and improving the outcomes of transplantation.

Our experts have pioneered many procedures, including living-donor kidney transplants and kidney transplant before dialysis is needed.

The Mayo Clinic Transplant Center supports many studies for kidney transplant research.

Kidney transplant research at Mayo Clinic Kidney transplant research at Mayo Clinic

Nationally recognized expertise

Kidney transplant outcomes at Mayo Clinic compare favorably with the national average.

Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., has been recognized as the best Nephrology hospital in the nation for 2016-2017 by U.S. News & World Report.

Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., ranks No. 1 for diabetes and endocrinology in the U.S. News & World Report Best Hospitals rankings. Mayo Clinic in Scottsdale, Ariz., is ranked among the Best Hospitals for diabetes and endocrinology by U.S. News & World Report.

June 24, 2016
References
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  3. Treatment methods for kidney failure: Transplantation. National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases. http://kidney.niddk.nih.gov/KUDiseases/pubs/transplant/index.aspx. Accessed March 11, 2016.
  4. U.S. Department of Health and Human Resources. Organ matching. http://www.organdonor.gov/about/organmatching.html. Accessed April 7, 2016.
  5. The kidneys and how they work. National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases. http://kidney.niddk.nih.gov/KUDiseases/pubs/yourkidneys/index.aspx. Accessed March 11, 2016.
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  17. UNOS. Frequently asked questions about kidney transplant evaluation and listing. https://www.unos.org/wpcontent/uploads/unos/Kidney_Eval_Brochure.pdf. Accessed April 8, 2016.
  18. UNOS Transplant Living. Selecting a hospital. http://www.transplantliving.org/before-the-transplant/getting-on-the-list/selecting-a-hospital/. Accessed April 5, 2016.
  19. Living donation: Information you need to know. Transplant Living. https://www.unos.org/donation/living-donation/. Accessed March 30, 2016.
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  22. Preparing for the transplant. American Society of Transplantation. http://www.healthytransplant.com/health_maintenance/preparing_for_transplant.aspx. Accessed March 22, 2016.
  23. Orandi BJ, et al. Kidney transplants from incompatible live donors. New England Journal of Medicine. 2016;374:940.
  24. Stegall M. Dosing regimen of eculizumab added to conventional treatment in positive cross match living donor kidney transplant. ClinicalTrials.gov. http://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT00670774?term=eculizumab+and+mayo&rank=3. Accessed April 8, 2016.
  25. Heilman RL, et al. Impact of early conversion from tacrolimus to sirolimus on chronic allograft changes in kidney recipients on rapid steroid withdrawal. Transplantation. 2012;93:47.
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