How you prepare

Carefully follow your doctor's directions about how to prepare for surgery.

Clothing and personal items

If your child is having surgery, favorite items from home such as a stuffed animal, blanket or photos displayed in the hospital room may help comfort your child. This can help smooth the recovery process.

Avoid food or drink

Your doctor should tell you what time you or your child needs to stop eating and drinking in the hours before surgery. Having food or drink before surgery could lead to complications during surgery, such as inhaling partially digested food into the lungs (aspiration). Young children are generally scheduled for morning surgery. If you or your child eats or drinks after the requested cutoff time, surgery may have to be postponed.

March 01, 2016
References
  1. Lalwani AK. Stridor in children. In: Current Diagnosis & Treatment in Otolaryngology--Head & Neck Surgery. 3rd ed. New York, N.Y.: The McGraw-Hill Companies; 2012. http://www.accessmedicine.com. Accessed Jan. 7, 2016.
  2. Zeeshan A, et al. Laryngotracheal resection and reconstruction. Thoracic Surgery Clinics. 2014;24:67. Review.
  3. Tawfik KO, et al. Laryngotracheal reconstruction: A ten-year review of risk factors for decannulation failure. Laryngoscope. 2015;125:674.
  4. Raol N, et al. Comparison of hybrid laryngotracheal reconstruction to traditional single- and double-stage laryngotracheal reconstruction. Otolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery. 2015;152:524.
  5. Flint PW, et al. Glottic and subglottic stenosis. In: Cummings Otolaryngology: Head & Neck Surgery. 6th ed. Philadelphia, Pa.: Saunders Elsevier; 2015. http://www.clinicalkey.com. Accessed Jan. 13, 2016.
  6. Sidell DR, et al. Surgical management of posterior glottic diastasis in children. Annals of Otology, Rhinology, and Laryngology. 2015;124:72.
  7. Balakrishnan K. (expert opinion). Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn. Jan. 15, 2016.