Risks

Prenatal cell-free DNA screening poses no physical risks for you or your baby.

While prenatal cell-free DNA screening might cause anxiety, it might help you avoid the need for more invasive tests, treatment or monitoring during your pregnancy.

Keep in mind, however, that prenatal cell-free DNA screening doesn't screen for all chromosomal or genetic conditions. A negative test result does not ensure an unaffected pregnancy.

April 12, 2017
References
  1. AskMayoExpert. Prenatal cell-free DNA screening. Rochester, Minn.: Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research; 2016.
  2. American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists Committee on Genetics and the Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine. Committee Opinion No. 640: Cell-free DNA screening for fetal aneuploidy. Obstetrics & Gynecology. 2015;126:e31.
  3. Allyse M, et al. Non-invasive prenatal testing: A review of international implementation and challenges. International Journal of Women's Health. 2015;7:113.
  4. Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine Publications Committee. #36: Prenatal aneuploidy screening using cell-free DNA. American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology. 2015;212:711.
  5. Prenatal cell-free DNA screening. National Society of Genetic Counselors. http://www.acog.org/Resources-And-Publications/Endorsed-Documents. Accessed Jan. 18, 2017.
  6. Palomaki GE, et al. Prenatal screening for common aneuploidies using cell-free DNA. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed Jan. 17, 2017.
  7. Gregg AR, et al. Noninvasive prenatal screening for fetal aneuploidy, 2016 update: A position statement of the American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics. Genetics in Medicine. 2016;18:1056.

Prenatal cell-free DNA screening