Preparing for your appointment

Most people with chilblains don't need to see a doctor. If you're in pain or suspect you might have an infection, see your primary care doctor. He or she may suggest treatment or refer you to a doctor who specializes in skin disorders (dermatologist) or circulatory disorders (cardiologist).

Here's some information to help you get ready for your appointment.

What you can do

Before your appointment make a list of:

  • Symptoms you've noticed, including any that may seem unrelated to the reason for which you scheduled the appointment
  • Key personal information, including any major stresses, recent life changes or vacations to different climates
  • All medications, vitamins and supplements you take, including the doses
  • Questions to ask your doctor

For chilblains, some basic questions to ask your doctor include:

  • What's the most likely cause of my symptoms?
  • Are there other possible causes?
  • Do I need any tests?
  • Is this condition temporary or long lasting?
  • What treatments are available, and which do you recommend?
  • What side effects can I expect from treatment?
  • What are the alternatives to the primary approach that you're suggesting?
  • Do I need to restrict my activities in any way?
  • I have these other health conditions. How can I best manage them together?
  • Do you have any brochures or other printed material I can take with me? What websites do you recommend?

What to expect from your doctor

Your doctor is likely to ask you a number of questions, such as:

  • When did you begin experiencing symptoms?
  • Do your symptoms get worse in response to quick changes in temperature?
  • Does anything seem to improve your symptoms?
  • Have you ever had these symptoms before?
  • Have you been diagnosed with Raynaud's disease?

What you can do in the meantime

Try to keep the affected area warm and clean.

Dec. 10, 2015
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