The treatment for dermatitis varies, depending on the cause and each person's experience of the condition. In addition to the lifestyle and home remedies recommendations below, most dermatitis treatment plans include one or more of the following:

  • Applying corticosteroid creams
  • Applying certain creams or lotions that affect your immune system (calcineurin inhibitors)
  • Exposing the affected area to controlled amounts of natural or artificial light (phototherapy)

Alternative medicine

Many alternative therapies, including those listed below, have helped some people manage their dermatitis. But evidence for their effectiveness isn't conclusive.

  • Dietary supplements, such as vitamin D and probiotics, for atopic dermatitis
  • Rice bran broth (applied to the skin) for atopic dermatitis
  • Tea tree oil, either alone or added to your shampoo, for seborrheic dermatitis
  • Fish oil supplements for seborrheic dermatitis
  • Aloe vera for seborrheic dermatitis

If you're considering dietary supplements or other alternative therapies, talk with your doctor about their pros and cons.

June 17, 2016
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