Care at Mayo Clinic for eating disorders

Treatment at Mayo Clinic for children, teenagers and young adults with anorexia, bulimia or other eating disorders may include psychotherapy, nutrition counseling, medical care, medications and hospitalization if necessary.

Your Mayo Clinic care team

Your team may include psychologists, psychiatrists, nurses, dietitians and other medical professionals as needed who will coordinate your treatment. If your eating disorder is complicated by complex medical conditions, you'll especially benefit from Mayo Clinic's coordinated team approach to care.

Family-based therapy program

Mayo Clinic's family-based therapy program is highly successful in treating anorexia and bulimia in children, teens and young adults. Each child and family is assigned an individual care consultant — a psychologist trained in family-based therapy techniques. Unlike many treatment programs, the consultant at Mayo cares for that person until full recovery.

This innovative program focuses on:

  • Involving parents and other close family members as a crucial part of the treatment team
  • Developing an eating management plan for the person with anorexia or bulimia and teaching family members how to implement that plan at home to continue progress
  • Promoting effective communication and healthy family relationships
  • Helping the person develop more-effective coping strategies to reduce thoughts and behaviors associated with the eating disorder
Feb. 12, 2016
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