Preparing for your appointment

You'll likely start by seeing your primary care doctor. If lab tests reveal you have kidney damage, you might be referred to a doctor who specializes in kidney problems (nephrologist).

What you can do

To get ready for your appointment, ask if there's anything you need to do ahead of time, such as limit what you eat and drink. Then make a list of:

  • Your symptoms, including any that seem unrelated to your kidneys or urinary function, and when they began
  • All your medications and doses, including vitamins or other supplements that you take
  • Your key medical history, including any other medical conditions and family medical history
  • Questions to ask your doctor

Take a family member or friend along, if possible, to help you remember the information you're given.

For glomerulonephritis, some questions to ask your doctor include:

  • How badly do my kidneys seem to be affected?
  • What tests do I need?
  • Is my condition likely temporary or chronic?
  • Will I need dialysis?
  • I have other medical problems. How can I manage them together with this condition?
  • What restrictions do I need to follow?
  • Should I see a specialist?
  • Are there brochures or other printed material that I can have? What websites do you recommend?

Don't hesitate to ask other questions.

What to expect from your doctor

Your doctor is likely to ask you questions, such as:

  • Have your symptoms been continuous or occasional?
  • Does anything seem to improve or worsen your symptoms?
  • Does anyone in your family have a history of glomerulonephritis or other kidney disease?
  • Do you have a history of high blood pressure or diabetes mellitus?
Feb. 10, 2017
References
  1. The kidneys and how they work. National Kidney and Urologic Diseases Information Clearinghouse. http://kidney.niddk.nih.gov/KUDiseases/pubs/yourkidneys/index.aspx. Accessed Oct. 21, 2016.
  2. Glomerulonephritis. National Kidney Foundation. http://www.kidney.org/atoz/content/glomerul.cfm. Accessed Oct. 21, 2016.
  3. Hebert LA, et al. Differential diagnosis and evaluation of glomerular disease. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed Oct. 21, 2016.
  4. Glomerular diseases. National Kidney and Urologic Diseases Information Clearinghouse. http://kidney.niddk.nih.gov/KUDiseases/pubs/glomerular/index.aspx. Accessed Oct. 21, 2016.
  5. Kidney failure: Choosing a treatment that's right for you. National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases. https://www.niddk.nih.gov/health-information/health-topics/kidney-disease/kidney-failure-choosing-a-treatment-thats-right-for-you/Pages/facts.aspx. Accessed Oct. 21, 2016.
  6. Monga D, et al. Glomeruler diseases and cancer. American Society of Nephrology. https://www.asn-online.org/education/distancelearning/curricula/onco/. Accessed Oct. 31, 2016.
  7. Aslam N (expert opinion). Mayo Clinic, Jacksonville, Fla. Accessed Oct. 31, 2016.