Treatment

Impetigo typically is treated with an antibiotic ointment or cream that you apply directly to the sores. You may need to first soak the affected area in warm water or use wet compresses to help remove the scabs so the antibiotic can penetrate the skin.

If you have more than just a few impetigo sores, your doctor might recommend antibiotic drugs that can be taken by mouth. Be sure to finish the entire course of medication even if the sores are healed. This helps prevent the infection from recurring and makes antibiotic resistance less likely.

May 10, 2016
References
  1. AskMayoExpert. Impetigo. Rochester, Minn.: Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research; 2014.
  2. Baddour LM. Impetigo. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed Feb. 11, 2016.
  3. Hartman-Adams H, et al. Impetigo: Diagnosis and treatment. American Family Physician. 2014;90:229.
  4. Ferri FF. Impetigo. In: Ferri's Clinical Advisor 2016. Philadelphia, Pa.: Mosby Elsevier; 2016. http://www.clinicalkey.com. Accessed Feb. 11, 2016.
  5. Habif TP. Bacterial infections. In: Clinical Dermatology: A Color Guide to Diagnosis and Therapy. 6th ed. Philadelphia, Pa.: Saunders Elsevier; 2016. http://www.clinicalkey.com. Accessed Feb. 11, 2016.
  6. Kliegman RM, et al. Cutaneous bacterial infections. In: Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics. 20th ed. Philadelphia, Pa.: Elsevier; 2016. http://www.clinicalkey.com. Accessed Feb. 11, 2016.
  7. Bennett JE, et al. Cellulitis, necrotizing fasciitis, and subcutaneous tissue infections. In: Mandell, Douglas, and Bennett's Principles and Practice of Infectious Diseases. 8th ed. Philadelphia, Pa.: Saunders Elsevier; 2015. http://www.clinicalkey.com. Accessed Feb. 11, 2016.