Preparing for your appointment

You'll likely start by seeing your family doctor or a pediatrician. Depending on the cause of your child's symptoms, you might be referred to a specialist.

Here's information to help you get ready for your appointment.

What you can do

Before your appointment, make a list of:

  • Your child's symptoms, including any that might not seem related to the reason you made the appointment, and note when they started
  • Key personal information, including medications and supplements your child takes and whether anyone in your immediate family has had similar symptoms
  • Information about your child's diet, including food and drink he or she usually consumes

What to expect from your doctor

Your doctor might ask some of the following questions:

  • How often does your child play outdoors?
  • Does your child always wear sunscreen?
  • At what age did your child start walking?
  • Has your child had much tooth decay?
May 24, 2016
References
  1. Rickets. American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons. http://orthoinfo.aaos.org/topic.cfm?topic=a00577. Accessed March 21, 2016.
  2. Carpenter T. Overview of rickets in children. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed March 21, 2016.
  3. Carpenter T. Etiology and treatment of calcipenic rickets in children. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed March 21, 2016.
  4. Elder CJ, et al. Rickets. The Lancet. 2014;383:1665.
  5. Misra M. Vitamin D insufficiency and deficiency in children and adolescents. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed March 21, 2016.
  6. Vitamin D. Office of Dietary Supplements. http://ods.od.nih.gov/factsheets/VitaminD-QuickFacts. Accessed March 23, 2016.
  7. Vitamin D supplementation for infants. American Academy of Pediatrics. https://www.aap.org/en-us/about-the-aap/aap-press-room/pages/Vitamin-D-Supplementation-for-Infants.aspx. Accessed March 23, 2016.