You may not like how stretch marks make your skin look, but they don't require medical treatment. They are harmless and often fade over time. If you do seek treatment for stretch marks, know that treatments are only partially effective and won't remove them completely.

The following treatments are among those available to help improve the appearance and texture of stretch marks. None has been proved to be more consistently successful than the others.

  • Retinoid cream. Derived from vitamin A, retinoids — such as tretinoin (Retin-A, Renova, Avita) — that you apply to your skin may improve the appearance of stretch marks less than a few months old. Tretinoin, when it works, helps to rebuild collagen, making the stretch marks look more like your normal skin. Tretinoin can irritate your skin.

    If you're pregnant or nursing, talk with your doctor about other treatment options, because possible side effects of retinoid cream may affect the baby.

  • Light and laser therapies. A variety of light and laser therapies are available to help stimulate the growth of collagen or elastin in your skin. Your doctor can help you determine which technique is appropriate for you.
  • Microdermabrasion. This type of treatment involves a hand-held device that blows crystals onto skin. These crystals gently remove a fine layer of skin, promoting the growth of new, more-elastic skin.

Work with your doctor to choose the most appropriate treatment or combination of treatments for you. Factors to consider include:

  • How long you've had the stretch marks
  • Your skin type
  • Convenience, as some therapies require repeated doctor visits
  • Cost, as treatments to improve appearance (cosmetic therapies) often aren't covered by medical insurance
  • Your expectations

Alternative medicine

The idea that you can prevent or treat stretch marks by rubbing creams, oils or lotions on your skin is not supported by strong evidence.

If you're pregnant, check with your doctor before using alternative products that claim to treat or prevent stretch marks.

Jan. 07, 2016
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