Diagnosis

Diagnosis of genitourinary syndrome of menopause may involve:

  • Pelvic exam, during which your doctor feels (palpates) your pelvic organs and visually examines your external genitalia, vagina and cervix. During the pelvic exam, your doctor also checks for signs of pelvic organ prolapse — indicated by bulges in your vaginal walls from pelvic organs such as your bladder or rectum or stretching of the support tissues of the uterus.
  • Urine test, which involves collecting and analyzing your urine, if you have urinary symptoms.
  • Acid balance test, which involves taking a sample of vaginal fluids or placing a paper indicator strip in your vagina to test its acid balance.
April 23, 2016
References
  1. Atrophic vaginitis. First consult. https://www.clinicalkey.com. Accessed Feb. 17, 2016.
  2. Bachman G, et al. Clinical manifestations and diagnosis of vaginal atrophy. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed Feb. 17, 2016.
  3. Menopause. Merck Manual Professional Version. http://www.merckmanuals.com/professional/gynecology-and-obstetrics/menopause/menopause. Accessed Feb. 17, 2016.
  4. Palma F, et al. Vaginal atrophy of women in postmenopause. Results from a multicentric observational study: The AGATA study. Maturitas.2016;83:40.
  5. Bachman G, et al. Treatment of vaginal atrophy. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed Feb. 17, 2016.
  6. Goldman L, et al., eds. Menopause. In: Goldman-Cecil Medicine. 25th ed. Philadelphia, Pa.: Saunders Elsevier; 2016. http://www.clinicalkey.com. Accessed Feb. 17, 2016.
  7. Menopausal symptoms in depth. National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health. https://nccih.nih.gov/health/menopause/menopausesymptoms. Accessed Feb. 17, 2016.
  8. Thielen JM (expert opinion). Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn. Feb. 23, 2016.
  9. Portman DJ, et al. Genitourinary syndrome of menopause: New terminology for vulvovaginal atrophy from the International Society for the Study of Women's Sexual Health and The North American Menopause Society. Menopause. 2014;21:1063.