Exercise and physical activity should be a regular part of your life after a kidney transplant to continue improving your overall physical and mental health.

After a transplant, regular exercise helps boost energy levels and increase strength. It also helps you maintain a healthy weight, reduce stress and prevent common post-transplant complications such as high blood pressure and cholesterol levels.

Your Mayo Clinic transplant team will recommend a physical activity program based on your individual needs and goals.

Soon after your transplant, you should walk as much as you can. Then start incorporating more physical activity into your daily life, including participating in at least 30 minutes of moderate exercise five days a week.

Walking, bicycling, swimming, low-impact strength training and other physical activities you enjoy can all be a part of a healthy, active lifestyle after transplant. But be sure to check in with your transplant team before starting or changing your post-transplant exercise routine.

June 24, 2016
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